the poor dancing girl she won't dance again

‘If I should die,’ said I to myself, ‘I have left no immortal work behind me - nothing to make my friends proud of my memory - but I have lov’d the principle of beauty in all things, and if I had had time I would have made myself remember’d.’ - John Keats

“Like so many Americans, she was trying to construct a life that made sense from things she found in gift shops.” - Kurt Vonnegut

27. screenwriter. watcher of movies. taco lover extraordinaire. drinker of coffee. listener of music. I am obsessed with classic films, contribute to YAM Magazine, run this site: http://cinema-fanatic.com and do social media for Warner Bros. and Rotten Tomatoes

How To Be A Screenwriter

Wishlist // listography // 2014 in Films // 2014 in people getting hitched // 2014 in Books // About Me // film rec lists



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Posts tagged "Fanny Brawne"

"You dazzled me. There is nothing in the world so bright and delicate. You have absorbed me. I have a sensation at the present moment as if I was dissolving."

I wish you could infuse a little confidence of human nature into my heart. I cannot muster any - the world is too brutal for me - I am glad there is such a thing as the grave - I am sure I shall never have any rest till I get there.
John Keats in a letter to Fanny Brawne
If I cannot live with you I will live alone. I do not think my health will improve much while I am separated from you. For all this I am adverse to seeing you - I cannot bear flashes of light and return into my gloom again. I am not so unhappy now as I should be if I had seen you yesterday. To be happy with you seems such an impossibility! it requires a luckier Star than mine! it will never be.

John Keats in a letter to Fanny Brawne

My dearest love, I am afraid to see you; I am strong, but not strong enough to see you. Will my arm be ever round you again, and if so shall I be obliged to leave you again?
John Keats in a note to Fanny Brawne
Now I have had the opportunities of passing nights anxious and awake I have found other thoughts intrude upon me. ‘If I should die,’ said I to myself, ‘I have left no immortal work behind me - nothing to make my friends proud of my memory - but I have lov’d the principle of beauty in all things, and if I had had time I would have made myself remember’d.’
John Keats in a note to Fanny Brawne
On the night I was taken ill - when so violent a rush of blood came to my Lungs that I felt nearly suffocated - I assure you I felt it possible I might not survive, and at that moment thought of nothing but you. When I said to Brown, ‘this is unfortunate’ I thought of you.
John Keats in a note to Fanny Brawne
I have been astonished that Men could die Martyrs for religion - I have shudder’d at it. I shudder no more - I could be martyr’d for my Religion - Love is my religion - I could die for that. I could die for you. My Creed is Love and you are its only tenet. You have ravish’d me away by a Power I cannot resist; and yet I could resist till I saw you; and even since I have seen you I have endeavored often ‘to reason against the reasons of my Love.’ I can do that no more - the pain would be too great. My love is selfish. I cannot breathe without you.
John Keats in letter to Fanny Brawne, 13 October, 1819
My love has made me selfish. I cannot exist without you. I am forgetful of everything but seeing you again - my Life seems to stop there - I see no further. You have absorb’d me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I was dissolving - I should be exquisitely miserable without the hope of soon seeing you.. I should be afraid to separate myself far from you. My sweet Fanny, will your heart never change? My love, will it?
John Keats in letter to Fanny Brawne, 13 October, 1819